US agency says it will join probe into Ukrainian plane crash in Tehran

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NEW YORK: Amid mounting speculation that Ukrainian plane that crashed in Tehran minutes after take-off may have been mistakenly shot down by an Iranian missile, the US National Transportation Safety Board said it will join the probe.

 

NDTV quoted an agency statement posted on its Twitter account as saying that it had "received formal notification" from Iran of the crash which occurred on Wednesday.

"The NTSB has designated an accredited representative to the investigation of the crash," said the US agency which probes transport accidents.

BBC reported that Iran had said it will not hand over the recovered black box flight recorders to Boeing, the plane's manufacturer, or to the US. However, Iran's Foreign Ministry has invited Boeing to take part in the official inquiry into the crash.

The speculation over the crash mounted after several leaders said they had received intelligence suggesting an accidental missile hit. US President Donald Trump said on Thursday that he had "suspicions" about what happened to the plane.

Newsweek quoted a Pentagon and senior US intelligence officials, as well as an Iraqi intelligence official, as saying they believed Ukraine International Airlines flight PS752 was hit by a Russian-made Tor missile.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he had received intelligence from multiple sources indicating that the plane was shot down by an Iranian surface-to air missile, adding that it was possible that this was unintentional, the BBC report said.

A total of 63 Canadians were on the flight, along with dozens of others who were expecting to fly on to Toronto from Kyiv.

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson echoed Trudeau's words and said Britain was working closely with Canada and other international partners affected by the crash.

Image Credit: Times of Israel

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